Tuesday, March 22, 2016

15 Minutes Could Save You 15% or More On...Dog Insurance?

Hey, guys!




Recently I've started looking into pet insurance, and I'm a bit overwhelmed. So many choices! I'm hoping y'all can shed some light on the issue and share your experiences.

My dogs are all under 6, young and healthy with no existing conditions. I'd like to look into it now, while they are in perfect shape, than later when things may be different. I'd also rather have insurance and not need it, than need it and not have it.

Dachshunds are generally healthy, but their big issues tend to be very, very expensive. Back surgeries alone are enough to make you choke, and epilepsy and Cushing's disease are no walk in the park. I'd much, much rather have the option of coverage in the event of an emergency, rather than having to decline or alter care due to budget constraints.

I've heard people say they put X amount of money away per month into a dog only account, but that doesn't seem like it would work in my opinion. It would take a long time to build up a nice cushion, and once it was used, you'd have to start all over again. Plus, you never know when times may get really tight and you'd be forced to dip into the dog account. For me, I'd rather look into insurance.

Since some of these companies exclude conditions your breed may be predisposed to, I've been looking mostly at Trupanion and Healthy Paws. Both have no finical limit (per year, illness or pet), both let you choose your own deductible, and both cover alternative care such as hydrotherapy, acupuncture, physical therapy ect (Trupanion as a $5.16/mo add-on for Nola's stats). Trupanion includes behavior modification training in their add-on plan. Both can be used at any vet nation wide.
Neither cover routine care, and I'm okay with that.

I'm using Nola as an example for these:

Trupanion - $200 deductible, 90% reimbursement, with the add-on of alternative care = $47.61 per month, or $571.32 per year

Healthy Paws - $200 deductible, 90% reimbursement = $39.83, or $477.96 per year.


What are your thoughts on pet insurance? Do you have or want it? If you have it, who do you use and how has your experience been?

- Dachshund Mommy


11 comments:

  1. We have talked about this for Cocoa but didn't get past the talking part, haha. I wish we had it from the beginning because we did spend a lot of money on vet visits when she was little. I like that it covers alternative therapies. I am going to look into this more.

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  2. We have Healthy Paws. So far so good
    Snorts,
    Lily & Edward

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  3. I have healthy paws for my youngest dogs and I love the coverage. I selected it because it has no limits and it doesnt exclude breed specific conditions. My older pets have embrace. I used embrace a lot when Norbert was alive. Ive yet to need to use healthy paws, knock on wood I never will.
    retro rover

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  4. The savings plan is not a good alternative in my opinion...unless you have about $5k right off the bat. Pet insurance saved by butt with Boca's eye surgery, and if we never make another claim it has already practically paid for itself for their lifetimes. Ruby is with Healthy Paws and Boca is with Embrace. They all have their pros and cons and they are all different - it's so important to read the fine print! A lot of people have a very negative opinion of pet insurance and I think this is mostly due to not understanding insurance in general or not reading their policy. I did a pretty extensive post about it with a comparison chart: http://www.rubicondays.com/2015/04/bubble-wrap-or-pet-insurance.html

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  5. We have pet insurance through the military and it's like a few dollars a month. It covers their surgeries or major illnesses. Totally worth it!!

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  6. I've never had dog insurance and never needed it until Bridge was ill and boy, did I wish I had it then!
    The problem is they won't insure them over here once they hit about 9 or 10.
    Lynne x

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  7. We talked, researched...and decided to not do the doggy insurance. In the long run you end up paying more if not completely covering an expensive medical procedure that you may or may not have to deal with in your dog. We decided the best route is saving money, regular check ups, keeping the dogs healthy, etc... You can also look into carecredit it's like a credit card for health care only, they cover vet bills with no interest if paid back within a certain time frame. So we decided that if the time comes to need something spendy then we'll go the carecredit route since we already have the cards and our vet takes them.

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  8. I really want to get the girls insurance. I've been looking into it, too!

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  9. After Barkley's expenses when he got cancer quickly went into the thousands, I got pet insurance for Abby Lab. Being 7 and with scetchy care prior (she was dumped at a shelter having had multiple litters heartworm positive) I wanted that for her. I have a plan that covers up to $30,000 in a year but it's almost $50 a month, more than I'd spend if she was a pup, but as a senior, it's saved us on some dental work that needed to be done.

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  10. After Barkley's expenses when he got cancer quickly went into the thousands, I got pet insurance for Abby Lab. Being 7 and with scetchy care prior (she was dumped at a shelter having had multiple litters heartworm positive) I wanted that for her. I have a plan that covers up to $30,000 in a year but it's almost $50 a month, more than I'd spend if she was a pup, but as a senior, it's saved us on some dental work that needed to be done.

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  11. We have Pets Best for our 10 year old dachshund, Hans. We were dumb and waited a year post-rescue to sign him and his sister, Greta, up, and their wonky definition of pre-existing conditions made it a total waste of money for Greta but a good fit for Hans. Greta once had elevated liver enzymes and one back episode pre-coverage, so they rejected every claim for her, from UTIs to cushings to a neck disc episode. Hans, however, has had the vast majority of claims covered, including an echocardiogram and semi-annual x-rays to monitor a heart murmur. Wellness exams and dentals aren't covered. You can always tally you total expenses for a year without it, sign up for a year, and then compare the stats and see if it's worth it.

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Thank you for commenting!